Have an Attitude of Gratitude!

Last week I attended a Mental Health Seminar on Tactics for Maintaining Mental Fitness During the COVID-19 Pandemic webinar by Dr Bill Howatt of Howatt HR.  The response to the seminar was so overwhelming that Dr. Howatt is now leading a seminar each week while we maintain self-isolation.

In the previous webinar, Dr. Howatt mentioned we need to intentionally charge our batteries especially during this time of isolation as it can drain our batteries quickly.   He mentioned making sure we prioritize sleep, be active, eat fruits and vegetables and find a connection as four ways to charge our batteries.  This week, he focused on maintaining a sense of gratitude.

Gratitude is the intention of being grateful and showing appreciation; acknowledging what is good in our lives.

How do you incorporate gratitude into your day?

  • Do you express it in a journal, write it on a post-it note and put it on your fridge?
  • Do you have a gratitude object like a picture or a stress ball?
  • Do you thank people in person or if at a distance, thank them mentally?
  • Do you acknowledge others?

He reminds us to be sure to write down our Mental Fitness Plan as what is written, gets done; therefore, intentionally charging our battery.   Keith Harrell, life coach and motivational speaker, of Harrell Performance Systems says:

“Write down what you want to do and for what purpose.  Make a plan to achieve it – and then put that plan into action!”



Security Measures When Using the Internet

Computers, cell phones, tablets, and other electronic equipment are not as private as we are led to believe.  Safe guard your identification badges and passwords.

There is also a possibility of sending misdirected e-mails, having cell phone conversations and sending texts with language we would not normally use if we were in front of the person.  Be sure to always use the electronic device as if you are in the room with the person in which your e-mail, phone call or text is directed.  Anonymity seems to make us braver and act differently than we normally would.

Below are some hints and tips to protect your internet security.

Internet Security Tips:

  • Have a specific e-mail address that you use only with family, friends, relatives, peers and colleagues. Depending on the e-mail address or service provider, it can be traced back to your location.
  • Use a general e-mail account like yahoo and Gmail for online activities such as Facebook, Group Chat, Newsgroups, Snapchat, Twitter, etc.
  • Do not fill in the personal profile sections in apps or webpages like Facebook, Group Chat, Newsgroups, Snapchat, and Twitter.
  • Use strong passwords. Should be something not easily guessed and of at least 10-12 characters.
  • Adjust settings and filters to block unwanted messages.
  • Choose your internet name and e-mail address wisely. Try not to identify who you are, your gender, or your location.
  • Do not open attachments that seem peculiar or unexpected from e-mail addresses you know and don’t know. If not sure, call the person or send a new e-mail to the person to check to see it is from them.
  • Do not reply to or open suspicious e-mails.
  • Set you internet browser security to high and be specific with the websites you visit. Unwanted visits to random websites can lead to unwanted messages and e-mails.
  • Cyberbullying and cyberstalking is as dangerous as if it was in person.
    • Report problems to local IT personnel or on the forum in which the events started. You may need to contact your internet service provider.
    • If the cyberbullying and cyberstalking continue, contact your local police and let them know you are concerned about your safety.
  • In the event, where laptops, tablets or phones are stolen, keep passwords and personal information in another location not on the electronic device.
  • Search your name on the internet to see what comes up. Were you easy to find?
  • Be wary of meeting someone in person you have met online whether through business or pleasure. Take precautions to protect your personal and physical security if you decide to go ahead and meet.

Today we need to be aware of the fraudulent phone calls, text messages, and e-mails known as phishing attacks where scammers try to steal your personal information and passwords.  Thousands of phishing attacks are launched on a daily basis and unfortunately, they are most often successful in gaining your information.  With our new imposed restrictions and requirement to isolate, many of us are working remotely and relying heavily on our electronic devices, this has made users vulnerable to attacks.

Here are a few samples of what messaging may look like when there is a phishing attack.  Remember these attacks can look like they are coming from someone you know.  The scammer uses special software to pretend to be someone they are not.

Sample Messaging of Phishing Attacks:

  • State in the e-mail or message they have noticed suspicious activity or log-in attempts.
  • State there may be a problem with your account or your payment information.
  • Ask you to confirm some personal information.
  • Attach a fake document to the e-mail.
  • Ask you to click on a link to make a payment.
  • State you have won something or entitled to monies.
  • Offer you discounts or rewards on products.

Protect your internet security by being kind to others and not trusting everyone.  It is ok to investigate e-mails and ask questions if you are not sure.  You are only one click away from a harmful situation if you don’t ask questions.



Are you recharging your battery?

Dr. Howatt, President of Howatt HR Consulting, believes being in isolation for 2 weeks will greatly impact our mental health.  He says, “we are like batteries, and like batteries we can be anywhere from charged to empty on a daily basis.”

Personal and situational stressors can drain your battery such as stress, burnout, anxiety, harassment, chronic issues, gossip, workload, distrust, depression, injuries, and incidents.

You need to intentionally recharge your battery by prioritizing sleep, being active, eating fruits and vegetables and finding a connection rather than self-medicating.

If you have been following the NSFA on social media you can see we are trying to stay connected using zoom and Snapchat.  Today we had a coffee break for 15 min over zoom just to catch up on what is going on with everyone.  We are going to continue this on a daily basis.

Find creative ways to stay connected and charge your battery.

If you feel you are struggling with anxiety and depression as well as the inability to charge your battery, there is an anonymous peer support group online called The Big White Wall.  Visit bigwhitewall.com.  I screen shot is below giving a few details of how they offer support.

 

Alternatively, another source to reach out to is the Farm Family Support Center at 1-844-880-9142 it is confidential and immediate support is available 24/7/365.



On-Farm Advisory Services

We know your time is valuable and you have very little of it to spare, so we did the work for you.  We found the perfect top dressing for your safety program needs. The Farm Safety Advisor!

The Farm Safety advisor can help you Mind the G.A.P FARM-FARM-FARM.

To implement a safety program of Good Analytical Practice you can FARM – Focused Approach Right Method – a Farm Safety Plan today to reduce the costs associated with incident and injury on the farm and ensure all of your workers and family return home in the same condition they went to the farm each day.

The Farm Safety Advisor will come to your farm and evaluate the health and safety hazards based on the tasks performed on your particular farm and help build a farm safety plan specific to your needs and farm activities.

Not only will a customized Farm Safety Plan reduce the incidents and injuries on your farm but it will enhance the safety culture as well as increase farm productivity, efficiency and sustainability.

If you are an NSFA member the cost of the On-Farm Advisory services after the initial consult is $75/hour plus expenses (travel, printing, and postage) and Non-Members it is $125/hour plus expenses (travel, printing, and postage).  Complete cost estimate to be provided and confirmed after the initial consultation.

Contact the Farm Safety Advisor today to book your consult.  Phone Lori Brookhouse at 902-893-2293 or e-mail lbrookhouse@nsfa-fane.ca.

 



Fatigue at Risk Management Program

Fatigue is as much or even more of a hazard like chemicals, farm machinery, silos, grain bins, manure pits, power tools, animal handling, etc.

Fatigue can result in slower reaction time, lack of good judgement, being more easily distracted, not being able to concentrate on tasks, and the work may not be of the same quality as usual.

As we learn to Mind the G.A.P. FARM-FARM-FARM. One FARM is Fatigue At Risk Management. If we reduce fatigue by recognizing the signs and symptoms, know the effects of fatigue impairment, use a system to mitigate the risk, have an incident reporting process to gain information on how fatigue played a role in an incident, and use a fatigue calculator to measure the risk, we can engage the slow part of the brain (the Tortoise) more quickly.

Engaging the Slow Brain will allow us to be think consciously, analytically, more reasoned, more reflective and thoughtful resulting in less incident and injuries on the farm. Take a look at the resources below:

Recognizing Fatigue

Quality Sleep Can Make All the Difference

Fatigue Risk Management System

Fatigue Incident Report Form

Fatigue Calculator

Fatigue Risk Management Policy



Mind the GAP – FARM FARM FARM

Ever wonder why you do things even though you know better?  Well, the part of the brain that makes you do that is called the Fast Brain (the hare).  It processes visual information and delivers feedback as quickly as possible resulting in generalized visual perceptions, may miss important changes and make mistakes.  It only takes 4/10 of a second for this part of the brain to rule your next decision or action.

We need to start engaging the Slow Brain (the tortoise) first.  It takes at least 1 second for the slow brain to react and even longer if you are tired.

Farm Safety Nova Scotia can help you engage your slow brain through Mind the G.A.P.  FARM-FARM-FARM

FAST BRAIN = HARE

SLOW BRAIN = TORTOISE

Thinking:

  • Pre-conscious
  • Automatic
  • Reactive
  • Habitual
Thinking:

  • Conscious
  • Analytical
  • Reasoned
  • Reflective
  • Thoughtful
Activation Time:

4/10 of a second

Activation Time:

  • At least one second
  • Fatigue creates a slower activation
Goal:

Process visual information, give feedback quickly & you may miss important changes

Goal: 

  • Consciously goes through steps of a task
  • Evaluates all angles
Interference:

  • None, on autopilot
  • Frequent errors
Interference:

What’s the Cost?

  • Medical costs due to injury/illness
  • Replacement costs – tools & equipment
  • Repair costs – tools & equipment
  • Retraining – workers who fill in the absence
  • Legal – advice, lawsuits
  • Compliance or stop work orders – OHS
  • Reduced income – decreased productivity
  • Quality of life – injury affect workers abilities
  • Decrease moral – workers uncertain
What’s the Benefit?

  • Lower WCB costs or insurance costs
  • Increased production
  • Better quality of work
  • Positive safety culture
  • Increase profits
  • Return on investment
  • Prevent incident & injuries
  • Reduced stress
  • Increase sustainability
  • Consistent message
  • Worker retention

Join the movement and protect the tortoise from extinction.

FARM – Fatigue at Risk Management – reduce the fatigue.Mind the G.A.P.  FARM – FARM- FARM.

FARM – First Always Right-Minded – do the job right the first time.

FARM – Focused Approach; Right Method – clear and concise policies and procedures. Have a Plan.

Visit https://farmsafetyns.ca/farm-safety-plan/guide-to-farm-safety-plan/ to download your copy of the Farm Safety Plan Guide and Workbook resources.



Mind the GAP – Fatigue At Risk Management

There is one thing that can interfere with your safety plan and positive safety culture and that is FATIGUE.

FARM – Fatigue at Risk Management can help reduce fatigue by:

  • recognizing the signs and symptoms;
  • know the effects of fatigue impairment;
  • use a system to mitigate the risk;
  • have an incident reporting process to gain information on how fatigue played a role in an incident; and
  • use a fatigue calculator to measure the risk.

It only takes one 24-hour period of loss in deep sleep for moderate to severe cognitive fatigue to occur.

Fatigue impairment (Dekra (www.dekra-insight.com) includes:

  • impairment in their attention to detail,
  • impulse and risk inhibition,
  • accurate memory recall,
  • problem analysis,
  • conceptual thinking,
  • decision making, and
  • planning ahead

FARM – Fatigue at Risk Management sounds fancy, but it really isn’t.  It is as simple as finding out what makes us over tired and coming up with ways to get more rest to be our best selves.  We don’t have to wear sleep deprivation as a badge of honour anymore when working on the farm.  In this day and age, we have to become more creative to accommodate our fast-paced world so the demands don’t break us.

Visit https://farmsafetyns.ca/farm-safety-plan/guide-to-farm-safety-plan/ to download your copy of the Fatigue At Risk Management System.  You can choose to use all or parts of the program.  It is up to you!

Want help? Contact the Farm Safety Advisor at 902-893-2293 or lbrookhouse@nsfa-fane.ca to set up a workshop or take advantage of our advisory services for the low rate of $75/hour plus expenses.

FAST BRAIN = HARE

SLOW BRAIN = TORTOISE

Thinking:

  • Pre-conscious
  • Automatic
  • Reactive
  • Habitual
Thinking:

  • Conscious
  • Analytical
  • Reasoned
  • Reflective
  • Thoughtful
Activation Time:

4/10 of a second

Activation Time:

  • At least 1 second
  • Fatigue creates a slower activation time
Goal:

Process visual information & give feedback quickly & you may miss important changes

Goal:

  • Consciously goes through steps of a task.
  • Evaluates all angles
Interference:

  • None, on autopilot
  • Frequent Errors
Interference:



Mind the GAP – First Always Right Minded

Is your safety culture more like the tortoise or the hare?

FARM – First Always Right-Minded.

  • Doing the job right the first time
  • Increase efficiency
  • Reduce costs related to incident and injury
  • Increases farm sustainability.
  • Encourage workers to use the slow part of their brain
  • Employees will take ownership in their roles

There is a clear connection between safety culture and safe work performance according to the Gallup study (“The Relationship Between Engagement at Work and Organization Outcomes,” by Harter et al, Gallup, April 2016).  They found the more workers were engaged in their work, there were fewer incidents and injuries.

The study showed:

  • 78% higher success rate in businesses with an engaged workforce;
  • 70% fewer incidents; and
  • 41% less absenteeism.

To FARM your positive safety culture:

CHANGE THE MESSAGE FROM

CHANGE THE MESSAGE TO

  • urgent tones
  • hurry up
  • get it done
  • we are on a deadline
  • take your time
  • think it through
  • focus on doing the job right the first time
  • first always right minded
  • ask questions & ask for help

 

Visit https://farmsafetyns.ca/farm-safety-plan/guide-to-farm-safety-plan/ to download your copy of the Farm Safety Plan Guide and Workbook resources to start building your safety program today and turn your safety culture around.

Want help?  Contact the Farm Safety Advisor at 902-893-2293 or lbrookhouse@nsfa-fane.ca to set up a workshop or take advantage of our advisory services for the low rate of $75/hour plus expenses.

FAST BRAIN = HARE

SLOW BRAIN = TORTOISE

Thinking:

  • Pre-conscious
  • Automatic
  • Reactive
  • Habitual
Thinking:

  • Conscious
  • Analytical
  • Reasoned
  • Reflective
  • Thoughtful
Activation Time:

4/10 of a second

Activation Time:

  • At least 1 second
  • Fatigue creates a slower activation time
Goal:

Process visual information & give feedback quickly & you may miss important changes

Goal:

  • Consciously goes through steps of a task.
  • Evaluates all angles
Interference:

  • None, on autopilot
  • Frequent Errors
Interference:



Mind the GAP – Focused Approach Right Method

 

 FARM – Fatigue at Risk ManagementFARM – Focused Approach; Right MethodFARM – First Always Right-Minded.

The foundation for Mind the G.A.P. FARM – FARM – FARM! is to build a Farm Safety Plan.  G.A.P is an acronym for Good Analytical Practice.  To create a foundation to Mind the G.A.P. is to create a process for safety.  When processes are in place and used consistently this will help engage the slow part of our brain which will in turn reduce incident and injuries on the farm.

 

  1. One method of Mind the G.A.P. FARM – FARM – FARM is Focused Approach; Right Method. Develop clear and concise safe job procedures for hazardous tasks and ensure workers use them every time they perform the task.  Safe Job Procedures are step by step instructions for performing tasks.   Safe job procedures are designed to reduce the risk by minimizing potential exposure.  Safe Job procedures are the foundation of a Farm Safety Plan.
  2. A Company Health and Safety Policy creates another Focused Approach; Right Method by outlining the farms commitment to health and safety and the expectations for creating safe processes on the farm.
  3. Other components of a Farm Safety Plan that generate a Focused Approach; Right Method are safe work practices, inspections, communication, orientation checklists, safety policies, forms for incident investigation, and hazard identification.

Farm Safety Nova Scotia can provide helpful resources to FARM FARM FARM your way to Mind the G.A.P.  

Visit https://farmsafetyns.ca/farm-safety-plan/guide-to-farm-safety-plan/ to download your copy of the Farm Safety Plan Guide and Workbook resources to start building your safety program today.

Want help?  Contact the Farm Safety Advisor at 902-893-2293 or lbrookhouse@nsfa-fane.ca to set up a workshop or take advantage of our advisory services for the low rate of $75/hour plus expenses.

FAST BRAIN = HARE

SLOW BRAIN = TORTOISE

Thinking:

  • Pre-conscious
  • Automatic
  • Reactive
  • Habitual
Thinking:

  • Conscious
  • Analytical
  • Reasoned
  • Reflective
  • Thoughtful
Activation Time:

4/10 of a second

Activation Time:

  • At least 1 second
  • Fatigue creates a slower activation time
Goal:

Process visual information & give feedback quickly & you may miss important changes

Goal:

  • Consciously goes through steps of a task.
  • Evaluates all angles
Interference:

  • None, on autopilot
  • Frequent Errors
Interference:



Annual Report 2019

Our 2019 Annual Report is now online. If you’d like to see what we’ve been up to over the last year, have a look!



Events

  1. Progressive Agriculture Safety Day

    October 23 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Contact Us

7 Atlantic Central Drive
East Mountain, N.S.
B6L 2Z2

o: 902-893-2293
f: 902-893-7036
e: info@farmsafetyns.ca

Newsletter


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture, 7 Atlantic Central Drive, East Mountain, NS, B6L 2Z2, http://nsfa-fane.ca. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact